FAQs

Q?

What is the difference between open cell and closed cell foam?

A.

The primary difference is cost and performance per inch of depth. Closed cell also acts as moisture barrier which is important in cold, humid, climates where condensation is a concern, but not relevant in most of Arizona.

Closed cell more expensive and has a higher performance per inch than open cell. Since both products are high performing products, they quickly achieve diminishing returns as additional inches are added.

For example: Going from 2" to 10" of closed cell, adds less than 5% additional efficiency because the first two inches of closed cell are so effective.

Going from 5" to 20" of open cell adds less than 5% additional efficiency because the first five inches of open cell are so effective.

Where ever space is available (3" or more), it is recommended to install open cell because the same results are achieved as closed cell, but with much less cost.

Q?

How is foam insulation different than fiberglass or cellulose?

A.

Foam insulation creates a 100% air seal at 1-2" thick, depending on the foam product. Fiberglass or cellulose have 0% air seal, no matter how thick it is applied.

Foam completely stops uncontrolled airflow (energy loss), fiberglass and cellulose do not. This is the primary benefit of foam.

Foam insulation is a one time application, whereas fiberglass an cellulose needs to be replaced or added to over time due to settling and compaction.

Foam insulation is dust free. Fiberglass and cellulose are loose products that are a source for dust in a home.

Q?

How long does foam insulation last?

A.

If applied properly and the correct foam insulation product is specified for the job, foam insulation will last the life of a home. Most warranties go with the house and are transferable to future owners.

Q?

Is Retrofoam insulation installed from inside or outside the house?

A.

In most cases Retrofoam foam wall insulation is installed from outside of the house.

Q?

Can Retrofoam insulation be installed in the gap between the sheetrock and my block wall?

A.

Yes. Retrofoam can be installed in the gap between the sheetrock and the block, but it is more effective to install the foam in the block cores.

Q?

Can Retrofoam insulation be installed inside slump block or brick wall cavities?

A.

Yes. Many homeowners incorrectly believe that their homes are solid concrete block all the way through the wall. This is rarely the case, even in brick homes. Kasi Home Komfort Engineers can do a free non-invasive wall cavity probe for homeowners with slump block or brick homes.

Q?

How can you install foam insulation alongside my existing insulation?

A.

Yes. Foam insulation is injected alongside your existing insulation via a hose that is inserted into the wall. The foam insulation spreads alongside the fiberglass, compacting it against the exterior wall. Our video on the main page shows how this works.

Q?

How do you repair the holes that you make so they do not show?

A.

Our technicians have years of experience in drywall and stucco repair. We install a polystyrene foam plug in the penetration hole, add a base coat of stucco patch and then top coat the patch in the same pattern as the existing wall. Usually the repairs are undetectable, even to a trained eye.

Q?

How do you know if you have put enough foam insulation into the wall?

A.

We have three methods to determine how much foam insulation has been injected into the wall?

Timing and volume – Our technicians monitor the volume of foam insulation flowing through the hose. This determines how long it will take to fill the wall cavity and therefore how much foam insulation will be in the wall cavity.

Pressure – As the volume of foam insulation increases in the wall cavity, the foam will push back out of the insertion hole.

Sound and feel – After injecting thousands of wall cavities, our technicians know when a wall cavity is full or if it needs additional foam based on the sound emanating from the cavity and internal pressure exerted by the foam insulation on the hose.

Q?

Why is it necessary to remove the existing attic insulation before foam sealing an attic?

A.

There are three reasons for this:

1. Air Seal - Leaving insulation in the attic blocks all the bird holes and exterior wall top plates, which prevents the foam from achieving an air seal.

2. Installation - When foam is applied it is sprayed out of a nozzle at very high pressure. In a confined attic space this kicks existing insulation up in the air and coats everything in the attic, including the substrate where the foam is to be applied and the technicians eye protection. If the substrate is covered with existing insulation the foam will not bond to the substrate. If the technicians eye protection is covered with existing insulation, they simply cannot see well enough to do a good job spraying the foam on the substrate.

3. Warranty - Manufacture's know that contractors who are willing to skip extracting the existing insulation prior to applying foam insulation in an attic, are not installing the foam in the way it was designed to be installed. Most likely if contractors are doing this, they are cutting corners in other areas as well. So all manufacture's warranties are void if the existing insulation is not removed prior to installation.